Nature`s Strongest Pain Killer is More Effective Than Morphine

Nature`s Strongest Pain Killer is More Effective Than Morphine

Growing your own food is one of the best ways to stay connected with nature. But, have you ever considered wild plants? Turns out that certain weeds can be tasty if prepared properly, and they are absolutely free!

For instance, wild lettuce is one of the best solutions for dealing with pain, and it has long been used as natural remedy.  And, it is often referred to as “poor man’s Opium.

If you’ve suffered anxiety, headaches, or muscle or joint pain, you might already be familiar with wild lettuce. It’s also effective at calming restlessness and reducing anxiety, and may even quell restless legs syndrome. When using a wild-lettuce supplement, take 30 to 120 milligrams before bed.

In a recently published article, Live Science collected some simple healthy weeds, including:

  • Dandelion: The entire plant is edible, and the leaves contain various vitamins and minerals, including potassium, calcium, iron, and manganese.
  • Purslane: Purslane tops the list of plants with omega-3 fats.
  • Lamb’s-quarters: These are healthy, delicious and easy to grow.
  • Plantain:  Its nutritional profile is similar to dandelion.
  • Stinging Nettles: These are tasty and nutritious cooked or prepared as a tea.

Major Groupings of Wild Edible Plants

Plants are classified in groups based on their botanical family, and there are countless families within the plant kingdom.  In this article, we will focus on a couple of select members of the following 5 families:

According to Mother Earth News, purslane is the most reported “weed” species in the world. It resembles a miniature jade plant, with succulent leaves and red stems.  In July, it develops yellow flowers about ¼ inch in diameter.  The seeds of purslane are quite tough, remaining viable in soil for up to four decades.  One plant can produce up to 200,000 seeds.

Purslane

According to Mother Earth News, purslane is the most reported “weed” species in the world. It resembles a miniature jade plant, with succulent leaves and red stems.  In July, it develops yellow flowers about ¼ inch in diameter.  The seeds of purslane are quite tough, remaining viable in soil for up to four decades.  One plant can produce up to 200,000 seeds.

Nutritional Benefits:

  • Rich in manganese, magnesium, calcium, iron, riboflavin, potassium, phosphorous
  • SIX times more vitamin E than spinach
  • SEVEN times more beta carotene than carrots, providing 1320 IU/100g of vitamin A (44 percent of the RDA), which is one of the highest among green leafy vegetables
  • 25 mg of vitamin C per cup (20 % of the RDA)

Purslane is reportedly beneficial if you have urinary or digestive problems, and has antifungal and antimicrobial effects. It has also been found useful for skin conditions such as acne, psoriasis, and sunburn. Some people compare purslane’s taste to spinach or watercress, with a “crunchy lemony” flavor. Look for tender young leaves and stems, which are good in salads or sandwiches. Purslane is also rich in pectin, so it can be used to thicken soups and stews. According to Weston A. Price Foundation, the ancient Greeks made a bread flour from Purslane seeds and pickled its fleshy stems; the Mexicans enjoy it with eggs and pork, and the Chinese toss it with noodles.

Dandelion

Dandelion goes by many different names, from lion`s tooth,  monk`s head,  and Irish daisy to blowball and priest`s crow.  Dandelions have potent antioxidant properties and contain compounds with strong therapeutic properties.

They contain:

  • Agent for treating burns and stings (inside surface of flower stems)
  • Laxative and diuretic; useful for premenstrual bloating and edema
  • Normalizing blood sugar and cholesterol (dandelion root)
  • Tonic; appetite stimulant and a good general stomach remedy
  • Liver cleanser; remedy for liver and gall bladder problems

Lamb’s Quarter

Lamb`s quarter, also known as fat-hen or wild spinach, gets to be quite tall, reaching up to six feet. It can be found in disturbed soil, vacant lots, along roadsides, and in overgrown fields.

Lamb’s quarter contains:

  • More than 4 % protein
  • A whopping 11,600 IU of beta carotene per half cup (compared to 6500mg for Swiss chard, and 8100mg for spinach)
  • 300mg calcium per half cup (compared to 88mg for Swiss chard, and 93mg for spinach)

It is also packed with vitamin C, thiamine, riboflavin, folate, magnesium, potassium, vitamin E, and B6.

Plantain

Plantain goes by many different names, including snakeweed, ripple grass, broadleaf plantain, Englishman`s foot, and more. The leaves of plantains are edible cooked or raw and are packed with riboflavin and vitamin B1.  One American Indian name for this plant translates as “life medicine,” which says it all.

It is packed with effective agents, such as apigenin, antioxidants, salicylic acid, benzoic acid, among others, which give the plant a wide range of uses as a diuretic, anti-inflammatory, poison antidote, antitussive, and heart remedy.

It has been scientifically proven that it can help with a variety of problems, such as rheumatism, hypertension, fever, allergies, asthma, bronchitis, coughing, diarrhea, constipation, skin problems, wounds, bites, and more.

Stinging Nettles

Nettles are rich in potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, and vitamins A ,C, D, and K. Each cup of nettles provides the body with 1,790 IU of vitamin A, which is three days’ RDA.

Stinging nettle has the following medicinal uses, such as treating anemia and fatigue, relieving arthritis, joint pain, and gout (internally and externally), treating enlarged prostate (Benign Prostate Hyperplasia, or BPH), treating urinary tract infections, diuretic, and more.

Source:

https://www.healthy-holistic-living.com/dandelion-and-other-wild-edible-plants-the-hidden-food-in-your-yard/